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Listed buildings in Blackpool

Page 3 of 6

Page 3: Kiosks in Abingdon Street, Kiosks in Talbot Square, Lady of Lourdes, Library and Art Gallery, Marton Mill.

Page 1 - Bispham Parish Church, Blowing Sands, Cabin Lift, Cemetary Chapel, Elmslie School, Fishers Lane. Click here

Page 2: Grand Theatre, Holy Trinity Church, Imperial Hotel, King Edward Cinema(former). Click here

Page 4: Miners Convelescent Home, New Clifton Hotel, North Pier, North Shore Shelters, North Shore Methodist Chapel, Odeon Cinema. Click here

Page 5: Old Grammar School, Post Office, Raikes Hall, South Shore Promenade Shelters, sundial. Click here

Page 6: St Johns, Synagogue, Tower, Town Hall, Walkers Hill Farmhouse, War Memorial, White Tower, Winter Gardens. Click Here

Kiosks in Abingdon Street

GRADE 2 - Listed 14.6.1988

This group of eight cast iron telephone kiosks is situated outside the Head Post Office.  The kiosks are of the K type, designed in 1935 by

Sir Giles Gilbert Scott.

Kiosks in Talbot Square

Grade2 -- Listed 31.3.1995

Single kiosk to the east and twin kiosks to the west of the Sacred Heart Church.

Telephone kiosks type K6., designed in 1935 by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott.  Made in cast iron by various contractors. Each is square with a domed roof and has unperforated crowns to top panels and margin glazing to windows and doors.

Lady of Lourdes

Lady of Lourdes

Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes

Whinney Heys Road

Grade 2* - Listed 30.06.1999

War memorial thanksgiving chapel, with vestries and entrance steps. 1955-7 to the designs of F.X. Velarde; Eaves and Co., builders. 

Portland stone, with copper-clad roof and fleche. 

Near-rectangular plan of four bay church with single-bay narthex and sanctuary apse at their respective ends, with projecting vestries at East end. 

West end blind, with over round-arched timber double doors a relief of the Holy Trinity by David John, who also sculpted the pinnacles at each corner of the building, which depict our Lady appearing to St Bernadette, Christ appearing to St Margaret Mary, St Thomas of Canterbuy and St Edward the Confessor.  Those at West end are set on fluted buttresses. 

Rectangular panels of glazing, filled with alternating square and lozenge tracery patterns of red and blue glass.  Circular motif to tracery in round-headed little vestry windows.  Central fleche with gilded bands contrasting with the copper, and central cross motif, surmounted by cross.  

York stone steps between stone flank walls to entrance

The interior is equally magnificently appointed.  Round-arched arcades clad in gold mosaic,  with cross motif, support ceiling of vivid blue, red and gold.  Tiled floor with cross motif.    Raised sanctuary reached up marble steps in apse with round-arched opening.   Sanctuary floor of marble with mosaic panels.  Bronze altar rails of art deco design, related in style to glazed screen at west end of church, which is finished in lacquered bronze.  Altar and reredos of gris mouchete stone carved by David John.

The Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes, patron saint of the Diocese of Lancaster, was conceived by the Right Reverend Thomas E. Flynn, Bishop of Lancaster, as a thanksgiving chapel to the diocese’s relatively unscathed survival through World War II. 

In September 1945 Bishop Flynn wrote: “During the war as the danger became more acute, and one diocese after another suffered terrible losses of life and property, I asked for earnest prayers to our patroness, Our Lady of Lourdes….and we were marvellously spared.  The thought was in my mind during that period of anxiety that after the war I should ask the diocese to make an offering to God to show our gratitude”.

The shrine cost £50,000 to which every parish in the diocese subscribed.  Blackpool was chosen for its central position and ease of access to visitors; a local builder, William Eaves, donated the site. 

The shrine was tended by nuns of the Congregation of Adoration of Mare Reparatrice.  Most recently the shrine has been attended by the Blessed Sacrament of Fathers.  Velarde’s work was described in the opening literature as “although original in design (having) its roots in the Ancient Romanesque Architecture”.  While his St Teresa, Upholland, of the same date, shares the combination of modern sculpture, gilded mosaic and round-arched detailing found here, the shrine has a perfect, diminutive jewel-like quality that transcends conventional church formulas.

Library and Art Gallery

Blackpool Central Library

The Central Library and Art Gallery were Grade II Listed on the 20th October 1983.

Designed by Cullen, Lockhead and Brown in a free Baroque style, the Library is built in red brick with stone dressings (1909).

The corner entrance, with curved colonnade of six Ionic columns surrounded by a balustrade and an octagonal lead-roofed dome, is flanked by identical facades to Queen Street and Abingdon Street.

Prominent piers with large arches over a bulleye and two decorated architraves and keystones.

Over the doorway is a stained glass window showing the Borough crest.  This window was renewed in 1999 as a Millennium gift from the Blackpool Civic Trust.

The Art Gallery, adjacent to the Queen Street façade, has coupled Ionic columns supporting a stone pediment bearing a carved Borough crest.

Marton Mill

Preston New Road

Grade 2 - Listed 20.10.1983

Built of whitewashed brick, this tower was constructed in 1838 by John Hays on the site of an earlier mill.  Worked at least until 1923, the mill was externally renovated in 1968, but with a parallel sided cap rather than the traditional “boat-shaped” Fylde cap as at Thornton.

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Updated: 24 March, 2010